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Motor for a revolve


ggoddardoe
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Hello,

We have built a 32 ft revolve that rides on casters that face up.  we have used this a few times and works great but we have borrowed a motor with a wheel attached to turn this revolve.  Does anyone know a vendor that I could look at that might carry a motor that would work for this that we can buy to create our own system?  I would rather have one that have to borrow all the time.

thank you

garry 

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5 hours ago, ggoddardoe said:

Hello,

We have built a 32 ft revolve that rides on casters that face up.  we have used this a few times and works great but we have borrowed a motor with a wheel attached to turn this revolve.  Does anyone know a vendor that I could look at that might carry a motor that would work for this that we can buy to create our own system?  I would rather have one that have to borrow all the time.

thank you

garry 

You could do worse than ask the Revolving Stage Company - based near me in Exhall, Coventry...

The Revolving Stage Company | Revolving Stage Hire for Events

 

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For our American friend, I would suggest Chicago Flyhouse as a company who could offer good advice on this.

I mean realistically I could answer the question but there's a lot of questions...

  • How heavy is the moving part of this revolve, and the things going on top of it?
  • Is the motor driving close to the centre of the revolve or close to the edge?
  • What desired speeds do you have in mind? With soft start and stop, I presume?
  • What is stopping this? 

Running from a single motor is relatively unconventional in professional revolves because it can be tough to ensure the thing stays completely flat all the time and thus in contact with the drive wheel. More common would be to use maybe 3 motors, which shares the load better (meaning you can use physically smaller motors, which thus fit better in the floor cavity) but also at instances where there is poor friction between one drive wheel and the revolve structure, there should still be decent friction with the two others. Situations where none of them have good contact with the structure are rarer. If you have a single motor and you stop the revolve in an area with poor contact between the drive wheel and the structure, you could find a situation where the motor spins freely and the revolve doesn't move.

There's enough variables involved in this that you're likely better off speaking to a company who do this locally to you, and know what's available locally, local regulations etc - I would say Chicago Flyhouse are a good example of a company who would tick these boxes. TAIT are there too of course, but likely well outside your DIY budget, and I'm not sure they'd even take this on.

Edited by dje
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Speak to your local overhead travelling crane company. This is exactly the kind of special project that my employer would take on. They will have all the technology you require.

Full disclosure: My employer is UK based, but does has representation in the states.

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