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matching a Shure radio mic to a sennheiser receiver


Frank.leggett

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I wonder if anyone on the forum might be able to help. I have a Sennheiser EK100 receiver and I use this with a SKP100 transmitter for recording on our camera. I have in the past been able to match the Sennheiser with a TOA WM 4210 Mic transmitter but it does suffer from a 2 sec delay as it locks on to the transmission. I have a gig coming up where the client is using a Shure PGX24 for making announcements over the PA system and I wondered if anyone has been able to marry a these with a Sennheiser receiver as I have no way to get a Shure receiver and the client won't use a different radio mic.

 

Any thoughts would be greatfully read.

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Beware of the different compander schemes that different manufacturers use. Some combinations can sound OK; others won't. The only way to find out is to try it of course.

 

It wouldn't hurt to keep a mic splitter and a beltpack transmitter with XLR input cable in your kit so if all else fails, you can grab a feed of the output of the house receiver.

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Thanks for the responses. I will try turning off the pilot tone to help with the delay with the TOA mic. Part of my question was does anyone know what frequencies the PGX24 transmitter is set to so I can tune in the receiver. This is not the SM58 version but the budget version with the PG head. Unfortunately I can't use a mic spltter as the house receiver is 50m away from where the mic is and that's where the camera is filming the speaker.

 

Frank

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What I was suggesting was to split the output of the house receiver between where it normally goes and your own beltpack transmitter in the same location. Your own receiver then lives with your camera as normal, 50m away or whatever. You'd have to be careful of frequencies in use so that you don't interfere with the house system and also not place the beltpack tx too close to the house receiver in order to avoid swamping it. You're essentially then just re-transmitting the output of the other radio mic system to your own receiver.

 

Edit to add: Shure aren't great at publishing their frequencies but are very helpful if you contact them. You'll need more than just "PGX24" though - there are several variants with different frequency sets. There should be some more information about exactly which model it is printed on the receiver.

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Good idea Shez about splitting and retransmitting, unfortunately the house PA guy is a cantankerous old sod who won't let anyone touch his equipment because he doesn't know how to get it working if there's a problem. I will contact Shure though. Thanks again for all the responses.
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The PG series are normally all channel 70 - as they're considered If it came from a music shop, it's probably a ch70 version. but they do supply them in channel 38 - which means you could be out of luck. There's usually a sticker on the receiver rear that shows the band.
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The PG stuff that I dealt with had some frequencies in C70 and some in licensed C69 with no way of knowing which was which without finding the right email contact at Shure.

The instructions read 'scan for a clear channel' so I suspect a lot of Shure PG kit is on illegal frequencies.

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The PG and PGX systems that are sold in the UK both come in the Ch 38 and Ch 70 versions. The Ch 70 versions are actually both 69 and 70 for PG and 68-70 for PGX. Of course after the DSO, only the Ch 70 frequencies can be used (863-865 MHz)

 

PG

 

Ch 38: 606-618 MHz (frequency band K6E)

Ch 70: 854-865 MHz (frequency band T10)

 

PGX

 

Ch 38: 606-630 MHz (frequency band K5E)

Ch 70: 846-865 MHz (frequency band T1)

 

Hope this helps :)

 

 

 

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