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Rigging Software


Kaividar

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So, I'm currently working on quite a big event with approx 120 rigging points. Until now,I've calculated the load on each point in my shows manually as it has been no more than 40-50 points. Since I'm more then doubling the amount rigging points now, I would like to find a software that could help me save some time. I've been looking at RigRight and it seems great. Anyone out here that has experience with that? Or any other good suggestions?

//KV

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1370683312[/url]' post='474871']

Always good to find other xkcd fans. :)

 

I don't know how involved the calculations are, but will Excel (other spreadsheet software available) not do the job?

 

It has done the job up until now. To make a template sheet that calculates multiple point loads and UDLs on a truss and takes cantilevers into account is not at all difficult. It's just a lot of "programming" :)! The math itself is not rocket science.

Off course, you could say "it's about 700kg on here and about 300kg on there", but as far as my OCD goes, it would be neat to know exactly. To be able to do that, you will have to do a bunch of calculations, make a spreadsheet that makes a bunch of calculations or get a software to do it. More and more venues wants to know exactly how much weight you put on each and every rigging point in their roof :)!

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Not a rigger, but simply applying my knowledge of Excel.

 

Can't you spend a bit of time, and create a Excel doc which has got all the formula's in it. and then you merely only need to punch in the unknown values each time (Such as, motor capacity, Weights, SWL's etc. etc.).

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Off course, you could say "it's about 700kg on here and about 300kg on there", but as far as my OCD goes, it would be neat to know exactly.

 

Always nice to refine things a bit more, as long as you realise that once you have 3 or more points on a truss *any* calculation is a guess to some extent.

"It's about 700kg here and about 300kg there" is in some ways a more accurate assesssment than "my calculations show its exactly 695 kg on here and 304kg on there", given that someone could stroll over to the motor controller, bump one motor and then it'll be more like 800/200 or 600/400.

 

Ultimately the only way you can know *exactly* what individual point loads are is to routinely use load cells and actually weigh them.

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Off course, you could say "it's about 700kg on here and about 300kg on there", but as far as my OCD goes, it would be neat to know exactly.

 

Ultimately the only way you can know *exactly* what individual point loads are is to routinely use load cells and actually weigh them.

 

Yepp, only this is, that's really hard to do 1 month prior to load in :D!

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Yepp, only this is, that's really hard to do 1 month prior to load in :D!

 

Well, yeah, I do understand that.

If I had something more helpful to post, I would have done it by now. :)

 

If you didn't already have a well fettled spreadsheet to at least add up the weights of each truss etc.. before concerning yourself with distribution of the load between points, I'd be suggesting you start there.

 

From an earlier post:

It has done the job up until now. To make a template sheet that calculates multiple point loads and UDLs on a truss and takes cantilevers into account is not at all difficult. It's just a lot of "programming" :)! The math itself is not rocket science.

 

You're already way ahead of me here anyway, once there are 3 or more hoists and the situation becomes "statically indeterminate" I think the maths is actually quite tough. Bit beyond me, anyway.

 

One thing I would suggest (apologies if I'm teaching granny to suck eggs here) - when indicating the loads on PA points don't be afraid to spec the weights of the motors in groups. (eg: "Main PA, xxxxKg total load between points S1, S2 and S3.) You can't reasonably be expected to anticipate exactly what angle the noise department will hang their line array at.

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One thing I would suggest (apologies if I'm teaching granny to suck eggs here) - when indicating the loads on PA points don't be afraid to spec the weights of the motors in groups. (eg: "Main PA, xxxxKg total load between points S1, S2 and S3.) You can't reasonably be expected to anticipate exactly what angle the noise department will hang their line array at.

 

No worries, the moment you see yourself as fully educated in this business is the moment you start missing out on stuff, no matter how many years of on hand experience you've got :D and I can not deny, it's a good suggestion!

 

I think I'll try out RigRight, as it takes me a lot less time to buy RigRight than to make a spreadsheet template. It's exactly for those situations where you have 14 different loads spread unevenly on one truss and it's 50m long and have 4 hoists that I want this. That's just as easy to calculate as a hoist with two motors and two point loads, but it's ten times the amount of numbers. (So we might be able to call it lazyness form my side.. :) )

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