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Lables on WAH PPE


willburgher

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I have recently purchased some working at height PPE Harness Lanyards etc.

 

was wondering if anyone had any good ways of labeling their kit as I know paints and pens can be damaging to the equipment and was wondering what the best way to do it would be.

 

 

Cheers.

 

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I'm guessing this is for identification?

 

My old employer used a system of etched washers with a unique serial number which was attached via a soldered ring to a point on the WAHPPE where it could easily be identified. Never washes off, comes unstuck or otherwise detaches from the PPE.

 

Could be adapted for your name / company etc?

 

** EDIT to add - if you use this method - ensure that the soldered ring is only large enough to attach the washer - so that it cannot mistakenly become part of your WAHPPE chain! **

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Simple option is a cable tie round a gear loop for a harness. Avoid attaching/marking ANY functional element of the kit. Bare in mind all the kit you buy will have a completely unique serial number, which will be present in your records of inspection, which should be more than sufficient to identify it from any other piece of kit whether owned by yourself or another individual.
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We use a key ring with the asset sticker inside of it attached to one of the rings. Same on the lanyards. Since the S/N's are all logged and written on the storage bags in BIG letters along with our logo, it is rather simple to prove that they belong to us. Our SOP is that rigger unpacks gear, inspects, signs inspection log (lives in bag) and dons the harness. When they are done, they pack it all back up in the bag. Chances of the PPE just walking off are greatly reduced that way - and risk of damage is reduced too.
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Personally I just have a colour-code. I got some narrow tape (5mm PVC tape), anything with a red-black-green banding on is mine.

 

The reality is that there is just not enough room on a lot of PPE to write things properly, nor a surface suitable. So IMO the best thing to do is keep it in a bag or case with your name on, then just colour code the items in case they get mixed up with somebody else's whilst out of the bag / case. Try to stick to a policy where you are either a) wearing your PPE or b) it's in it's box.

 

When putting tape on stuff make sure it doesn't cover any important markings though.

 

Our SOP is that rigger unpacks gear, inspects, signs inspection log (lives in bag) and dons the harness.

 

You sign an inspection log every time you put your harness on? That's quite extreme.

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I can't say I'm surprised that it's becoming policy, it just seems rather over the top. I make a habit of checking my harness for damage etc the first time I put it on each day, but not each time I put it on. But even then I don't sign any forms, what would be the point in that? I'm the only person who either uses it or inspects it, so who audits the signatures?

 

It may be policy for the company's full-timers since the PPE may be considered 'company property', but does it extend to the freelancers or contractors on the site?

 

Seems very OTT to sign your own inspection log every time you put your harness on. I will sometimes put it on and take it off 3 or 4 times a day, I would end up writing a book per month.

 

And surely if you do it to your harness you should do it to your helmet too? And if you signed an inspection record every time you put that on, you really would end up with a telephone directory of your own signatures.

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Since we do not employ freelance riggers and the PPE is company owned, yes we make everyone who uses it sign the log.

 

It is fairly standard in Australia - EWP's generally have log books - admittedly most people don't actually run through all the checks that you are meant to, but if something happens WorkSafe will come in and the first thing they will do is ask for the logbook. Since a harness is a lot more delicate than an EWP it makes sense to keep one for the harness as well.

 

The log is only for company owned kit, we don't have our own harnesses (well I do, but I don't keep it at work) - we are not a rigging company - we just have riggers on staff - The primary use for the harnesses is walking the ceiling beams where the catwalk does not extend to in one of our ballrooms or the really occasional job an arena.

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We use a Brother P-Touch Label system that prints out onto either fabric tape or laminated black print on white. You can stick your unique number/identifier to the kits own label or make it into a flag and attach it round a buckle or something suitable. All our unique numbers are QR codes that get generated from our asset management software (made in Filemaker Pro). these codes get read by Filemaker Go app on an IPAD linked with a barcode scanner.
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Simple option is a cable tie round a gear loop for a harness.

Not so keen on cable ties personally, ouchie.

 

Someone careful enough to avoid writing on webbing or gear labels with a marker would also probably want to avoid using pvc tape.

Its just as likely that the adhesive will damage the material as it is that the solvents in the marker pen ink will. (ie: in the real world, approximately zero chance)

 

We use a Brother P-Touch Label system that prints out onto either fabric tape or laminated black print on white.

 

That made me think of a few Petzl related tips:

 

The current 'Absorbica' shock absorbers come in a zippy pouch, there's room to write a few characters on the label inside, but if you want more you could sew a fabric label to it with a few stitches and keep it safe zipped up inside.

 

'Jane' lanyards and the rope lanyards with a Grillon have that plastic sheath over the stitched loop at the end. If you take the karabiner/maillon out you can slip a label inside where it'll be protected by the sheath and prevented from escaping by the karabiner.

 

The newer 'Bod' harnesses have a nice big sticky-out label at the waist that tucks into a pocket to keep it safely out of the way - again, if there's not enough space on there you could stick or stitch a fabric label to it, fold and squeeze it into the pocket as well.

 

All our unique numbers are QR codes that get generated from our asset management software (made in Filemaker Pro)...

Wow. That's pretty snazzy. :)

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Someone careful enough to avoid writing on webbing or gear labels with a marker would also probably want to avoid using pvc tape.

Its just as likely that the adhesive will damage the material as it is that the solvents in the marker pen ink will. (ie: in the real world, approximately zero chance)

 

Agree with you there, actually the gunk left behind after a few years of PVC tape is usually pretty grotty stuff and is more likely to do bad for things. As you say, in the real world, where things are subjected to all sorts of other less-than-ideal conditions, if your PPE is going to fall apart because you've written on it, I'd be more worried about whether it could tolerate my 100kg mass dropping a few metres in it! But unfortunately we have to abide! PPE inspectors will reject them.

 

The PVC tape thing I mentioned at the top is only something I use for metal products.

 

The current 'Absorbica' shock absorbers come in a zippy pouch, there's room to write a few characters on the label inside, but if you want more you could sew a fabric label to it with a few stitches and keep it safe zipped up inside.

 

I'm not saying you shouldn't, but even though the zippy pouch isn't load bearing, would it pass PPE inspections if altered by means of stitching a label in? I'd be careful I think. Not saying it would fail but it's worth checking perhaps (unless you already have?) I have a name & phone number inside the zippy pouch in case I leave it somewhere but it's just on a piece of paper, loose inside.

 

 

 

 

 

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Wow. That's pretty snazzy.

 

well we do have over 6000 items of kit!! mostly PPE related. gets a bit hard to keep a track of things !!

 

I'm not saying you shouldn't, but even though the zippy pouch isn't load bearing, would it pass PPE inspections if altered by means of stitching a label in? I'd be careful I think. Not saying it would fail but it's worth checking perhaps (unless you already have?) I have a name & phone number inside the zippy pouch in case I leave it somewhere but it's just on a piece of paper, loose inside.

 

 

didnt know that checking the zippy pouch was on the inspection form.. I guess ive been doing it wrong for the past 10 years ;) I would have thought that if you can get suitable access to the zippy pouch to sew things on then knock your self out. not a bad idea. just be careful you dont interfere with the webbing and stitching that forms the tear away part of the lanyard.

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didnt know that checking the zippy pouch was on the inspection form.. I guess ive been doing it wrong for the past 10 years ;)

 

I did say "I'm not saying you shouldn't", "the zippy pouch isn't load bearing", "I'd be careful", "not saying it would fail", "worth checking perhaps" and 2 question marks. All in all I don't think that constitutes suggesting you were wrong!

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I wasnt implying that I thought I had been doing it wrong for the past 10 years beacause a ) im a qualified PPE inspector and b) I have been doing it for the past 17 years and I know im doing it correctly thanks!!!

 

what I was saying is that the zippy pouch doesnt appear on any Petzl inspection forms as it is not a load bearing item. the same way the navaho harness bag doesnt appear either. What you were hinting at is that if you altered the pouch ( would it pass PPE inspections if altered by means of stitching a label in?) it may or may not fail. which is complete gonads. It is only a storage device for the tear away part of the item and is only designed to keep it safe.

 

TM :rolleyes:

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I wasnt implying that I thought I had been doing it wrong for the past 10 years beacause a ) im a qualified PPE inspector and b) I have been doing it for the past 17 years and I know im doing it correctly thanks!!!

 

what I was saying is that the zippy pouch doesnt appear on any Petzl inspection forms as it is not a load bearing item. the same way the navaho harness bag doesnt appear either. What you were hinting at is that if you altered the pouch ( would it pass PPE inspections if altered by means of stitching a label in?) it may or may not fail. which is complete gonads. It is only a storage device for the tear away part of the item and is only designed to keep it safe.

 

TM :rolleyes:

 

And I said worth checking perhaps and have now checked with someone who a ) is a qualified PPE inspector and b) has been doing it for the past 17 years , so theres no problem!

 

God I only suggested checking before doing something which might affect a test, I didnt actually state whether it would or not.

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