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RGB with Pars


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Hey,

 

I know you can buy those Parcans with 3 lamps to allow colour mixing - well could you just make your own with 3 standard parcans?

 

Take 3 parcans, focus at same position and put a red, blue and green in each and would that work and create lots of colours or would I end up with crappy red and blue mix up?

 

comp

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would using profiles or fresnels with harder edges help? Like for this charity gig, if we got 2 bars of 4 parcans, 3 with the RGB and one open white on each stand would save on lights and stuff. a few floorcans for the front and maybe 2 at the back to light the wall and you'd be done (kinda..)
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As has been said above - the 3 primary colours works a treat. However, just get your coverage right and you may see more than one beam colour in the air but the stage and performers will be hit by the mixed light. You will only require a o/w coverage if you want that effect and you want to dliute the washes into tones also.

 

You do open up far more opportunities for "shapes" and different looks if you go for a 3 colour wash rather than using the 3-in-1 option.

 

i.e. http://www.pauljneed.co.uk/nitin13.jpg

http://www.pauljneed.co.uk/nitin08.jpg

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for a music gig, there's also a rather nice side effect - anyone in the way casts shadows, and these shadows will be yellow, cyan and magenta, from green, blue and red - so it can be quite good - maybe also using the secondaries as the gel colours might be worth trying too. Pretty well no way of getting one solid colour due to light fall-off, angle difference, edge quality etc - but nice, nevertheless.
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In my opinion, and please disagree if you feel otherwise, maybe your thinking about this kind of the wrong way. What I mean to say is, rather than trying to 'mix' yellow, should you not just be trying to make a nice mixture of coloured washes? :D
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well the Rainbow pars you talk about have three transformers and three

lamps, each with a diachronic lens in front for the three primary colours.

The brightness is controlled electronically on board. How do you intend

having three colours? Gels will burn out and you cannot fit a 240v lamp,

time three in a par shell.

I am working with a venue which has been sold 12 of these. At the moment we

cannot get them to work correctly, so I will update the board about them. By

the way the other shortcoming is that even though the lamps are as close as

possible at source, you do get the three shadow effect, which won't suite

everybody!

 

Nick

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It's a great effect. Used most regularly in cyc lighting, 3 way coda's in the three primarys, you get the idea... However, as mentioned, the shadows are quite something! They prove to be quite a problem if you want to make anything look at all realistic, hence why it works on a cyc where you haev no shadows! IMO you're better off choosing a few colours, and sticking to them...
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If you work in a receiving house, especially one that gets loads of bands in, you'll find you're often asked to provide a "3 colour wash" so they can mix colours on the night. However, this usually means red, blue and amber rather than RGB as no-one likes the look of a green wash on people's faces - they appear to be rather ill! However, the amber is tricky because it is not a primary and thus contains quite a bit of red, which has it's own wash anyway. When you mix them all togther you gets lots of shades of pink!

 

The secondary mixing route works well, but remember that the colour temperature of theatre spots makes them quite yellowy to begin with. Thus the yellows will come over stronger and the magenta and cyan weaker. Even doing the cyan and magenta washes in 1Ks and the yellow washes in 1/2K can sometimes provide too strong a yellow.

 

So, to sum uo:

RGB - green looks nasty on faces

RAB - too pink

CMY - too yellow

 

Then there's those shadows to consider...

 

As they always say with anything 'arty' (like colour mixing) "there's no right answer".

 

JSB

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this isn't of course a very new idea - read Fred Bentham's book* - the bit about additive and subtractive colour mixing. It is of course the reason coda 3's come with three circuits!

 

It's just the technology that's changing, not the physics.

 

 

I used this idea as a "preset" for a magic lantern show which came in to the venue I worked at a few years ago - three intersecting circles in the primaries, giving a very pretty effect on the screen before the magic lanterns were fired up.

 

 

 

*published in the 1930s, I think????

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