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Can dry ice cause MAC failure?


mgastles

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During a dance show yesterday, we had a MAC700 on the stage floor completely fail. A technician at the theatre said this was due to the use of dry ice on the stage even though the dry ice vapour was 2 to 3 feet away from the MAC fixture. Has anyone had any problems like this?
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I seriously doubt it.

There wouldn't be a lot of condensation resulting from the CO2 because a Mac 700 generates quite a bit of heat so the fog would just evaporate quicker than normal. So unless the mover was drowned in CO2 for a long time it's highly unlikely to be a problem. And even then I'd doubt it.

 

I suspect a 'technician' is trying to sound cleverer than they are....

 

 

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It shouldn't have been the problem at all. I had worked a show with dry ice and movers in the same area. Not MAC's but the mover didn't fail and the show ran for a week. (Plus rehearsal time) Unless there was an initial fault with your MAC the dry ice shouldn't have been the cause of it failing.
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During a dance show yesterday, we had a MAC700 on the stage floor completely fail. A technician at the theatre said this was due to the use of dry ice on the stage even though the dry ice vapour was 2 to 3 feet away from the MAC fixture. Has anyone had any problems like this?

 

I presume you mean the problem of a numpty talking out of their ar5e! Yeah, 30 years of it! Maybe Martin should look at installing some LED display that could indicate what the problem is....

 

Oh, hold on!

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  • 3 weeks later...
dry ice will have no effect to the fixture. because the display is not working it sounds like the main processor has died. these things happen, it's an electronic device, with electricity comes heat, that is more likely the cause of component failure.
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This may not be relevant on this occasion as the vapour was 2-3 feet away, but surely as the vapour is just suspended water droplets, that could cause a short?

Not really. If the fixtures were off and cold there is a minute chance that something may condense and contribute to a problem, but as they were undoubtedly on and rather hot, the CO2 would evaporate far too quickly to cause any issue.

 

Besides, the vapour is in fact mostly CO2, and NOT water vapour.

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So for future reference, how much dry ice can I put into a MAC700 without causing issues? Is it acceptable to fill every available space inside with CO2 pellets leaving just enough room to get the side cover back on? We did notice it displaying a "cal-fail" message just before there was a loud bang and it went limp.

 

In future we may just drill a 40mm hole in the side of the light and pop pellets in by hand during the show.

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