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School technician just made technical director for school production o


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You'll need to come up with more specific questions than that if you're looking to get any useful assistance. Looking at your profile doesn't really say much. Who are you? what's your relationship with the school? What's your experience? Where's the production happening? What's the budget? Who's directing? Do you have spending rights? Is there something in particular that you're not sure about? Is there anything unusual happening in the show (technically) or do you just have to provide generic lights and sound?
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You'll need to come up with more specific questions than that if you're looking to get any useful assistance. Looking at your profile doesn't really say much. Who are you? what's your relationship with the school? What's your experience? Where's the production happening? What's the budget? Who's directing? Do you have spending rights? Is there something in particular that you're not sure about? Is there anything unusual happening in the show (technically) or do you just have to provide generic lights and sound?

 

It is a secondary school (13-18yrs). I am the performing arts technician. Just starting 2nd year at school. Experience is degree in music tech and years of band camp.

Directing is head of drama. I have an unknown budget.

Never been a technical director before. Not sure what my role entails.

Director wants slides projected on back wall of stage.

Performance taking place in 300 seat school auditorium.

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First of all, go ask him for a definition of what your role will involve. "Technical Director" sounds pretty fancy, but if all you're doing is controlling the slides projected on to the back of the wall, then the knowledge you require will be siginificantly different than if his definition of "Technical Director" equates to "Stage Manager".
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It is a secondary school (13-18yrs). I am the performing arts technician. Just starting 2nd year at school. Experience is degree in music tech and years of band camp.

 

From what you've written I'm unsure if you're a student, in their 2nd year of school, or a technician who has been at the school for 2 years.

My assumption is a student, as if you're a tech in performing arts then by your 2nd year I'd hope that you knew what was involved in the role. If a student, then yes, ask your Director to clarify your role. Any task can have a fancy title, but what is it that you'll actually be doing?

 

Asking more specific questions on here will get you helpful answers.

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It is a secondary school (13-18yrs). I am the performing arts technician. Just starting 2nd year at school. Experience is degree in music tech and years of band camp.

 

From what you've written I'm unsure if you're a student, in their 2nd year of school, or a technician who has been at the school for 2 years.

My assumption is a student...

Really? How many 14 year olds do you know with a degree in music tech?

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You can call yourself whatever the hell you like but in order to achieve results , certainly from here , some info about the show, the venue , early staging ideas (apart from the projection) -things like that.

 

We cant tell you HOW to light the show, thats up to you, but we can give advice about whats best to use and where/when to use it.

 

More clearer info and people will be glad to help. Also, check the Wiki. This kind of topic has already been discussed many, many times and im sure you can gather the infornmation from it and apply it to your venue / production.

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Sounds like you didn't duck fast enough. If the director is one of the typical sort, you got the job because he has a vision, but no technical knowledge to make it happen. If this is the case, then my best guess is that it's not a good idea to have too many ideas, unless you really want to get bogged down. Attend the meetings, note every comment like - "and as this happens, the words pinball wizzard blaze on the wall, almost blinding people and the pintable splits apart into two halves as the band blast out the intro to the song, with the words forcing their way though the smoke. This will be the first indication that you need a rear wall of 12V halogens spellling out the words, a mock up pintable that hinges open, and that you need smoke. The band 'blasting' will be a sign he wants a blam blast of volume. You'll have a hard time keeping up without introducing your own ideas too early. Save them for making his vision happen on no budget. Be supportive, try to do what he asks - but if you know something is daft or ultra expensive, that's the time to go in with "Brilliant, I've always wanted to do that but never had the budget" - this usually works.

 

As technical director, you inherit the responsibility for all the things that can go wrong, that the director will take no interest in at all. Sad, but that's the way it is - always!

 

Probably not the time to mention overtime payments, or will you be able to have a month off for working TOIL - if you are really keen, it will be good fun, but if you are feeling put upon, it's different.

 

Never be negative. Be positive and let them say stop when they realise the cost implications, don't say no we can't do that, say yes we can, and I know a firm who will hire us the kit for much less than the two grand XYZ will want.

 

Seriously though - he may well expect lots, but have no budget. If this is the case, you will have to find the way to break the news. If it wrecks his vision, then it will be your fault - comes with the job.

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