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Rigging Slings install question


RobbieM

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I have always been under the impression that nylon slings are not allowed to be used for permanent installations due to the fact that they melt and burn quickly in the event of fire. For this reason I have never used slings in a permanent installation.

I have been speaking with a friend who also installs and he tells me he has recently used slings on an install. I was quite shocked by his statement and told him my thoughts. He said he had used a well established industry sling manufacturing company to make these specifically for this job and that they new they were for a permanent install and never raised issue with this. I didn't see this as an excuse but he also said he had been told by various companies that this was not a problem.

I can't find any legislation specifying that this is a requirement under any regulation, the only requirement I can find states that under EEC regulations slings have to be certified each year.

 

Can anyone point me in the direction of any legislation without me asking Plasa or the PSA?

I'm now questioning this as so many times in the past I could have made installs much easier using slings but in the same sense I think its good safety practice not to.

 

Thanks

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Welcome to the Blue-Room Rob,

 

A good BR thread to read through which has some good info on the subject;

 

Slinging IWB's, chain or polyester

 

Look out for the points made by Martin Green, Seano and Chris Higgs.

 

 

I would suggest it is very case sensitive.

There are some applications where fibre slings in a permanent installation would be perfectly acceptable.

Btw, they are most likely polyester (Terylene).

Give us an example of where you feel you could have used roundslings over, say fabricated lifting points?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Different venues have different policies in my experience. I have been told by rigging services that during testing in fire conditions that steel baskets and slings fail quicker than span sets melt. The Aluminium crimp when heated fails quicker than a dynema sling.

 

Some venues also say safety's should be steel but the NEC group uses span sets as the points for them.

 

Slings and steels should be tested every year. If heavy use they should be tested as and when and one would hope every 6 months with rental comapnies.

 

When the rigging certificate comes in properly it should bring everyone to the same standard.

 

John

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I have been told ... ... that steel baskets and slings fail quicker than span sets melt. The Aluminium crimp when heated fails quicker than a dynema sling.

What does Dyneema have to do with it?

Climbing slings are often made with Dyneema (or Spectra, which is almost the same stuff), as far as I'm aware there aren't any Dyneema industrial slings on the market - unless you know different?

It has a significantly lower melting point than either nylon or polyester, btw.

 

Have you read the thread that Piers posted a link to above?

 

Slings and steels should be tested every year. If heavy use they should be tested as and when and one would hope every 6 months with rental comapnies.

Actually a thorough examination (not necessarily a 'test') is required *at least* every 6 months for lifting accessories (slings etc.) under LOLER.

 

When the rigging certificate comes in properly it should bring everyone to the same standard.

Yeah right. Like everybody drives to the same standard because they all have a driving licence and every plumber with an NVQ turns out work of the same consistently high quality as every other.

The NRC has a lot to recommend it, and may indeed raise standards and awareness of all sorts of things across the board, but that just ain't gonna happen.

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