Jump to content

installation electrician wanting to go on the road professionally. any


Recommended Posts

I have found this thread interesting as it highlights some of the "things" that I take for granted as being part of a strange world to outsiders but then I have never worked in any other business which makes me as naive in other industries as anyone.

 

The other odd thing is that the question of an installation sparks looking into working in our business seems to be very common at the moment. I have had a number of similar conversations, including a quizzing from an electricians sister (?) who was in the crowd at a recent festival. Once she had got my attention (earplugs) I was about to tell her that I didn't care less what she thought of the sound mix and that it wasn't my problem (must get a sign made up), she then gave me the third degree about getting her brother into the business. Luckily I was having a break from opping the boring Rawk band at the time and thought she might remember the name "Stage Electrics" to take away with her (that'll teach 'em).

 

Perhaps the bottom has fallen out of house bashing but were not exactly immune to the economy in this business either - FYI.

 

The thing to note is that the best event sparks that I know would actually make very poor installation electricians and usually vice versa. Other than the fact that we are all working with electricity, the disciplines are quite unconnected and the best person for the job is often someone who has a basic understanding of what everyone else is doing/trying to achieve rather than a head for electrical calculations.

 

Local crewing is a good place to start in that regard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have found this thread interesting as it highlights some of the "things" that I take for granted as being part of a strange world to outsiders but then I have never worked in any other business which makes me as naive in other industries as anyone.

 

The other odd thing is that the question of an installation sparks looking into working in our business seems to be very common at the moment. I have had a number of similar conversations, including a quizzing from an electricians sister (?) who was in the crowd at a recent festival. Once she had got my attention (earplugs) I was about to tell her that I didn't care less what she thought of the sound mix and that it wasn't my problem (must get a sign made up), she then gave me the third degree about getting her brother into the business. Luckily I was having a break from opping the boring Rawk band at the time and thought she might remember the name "Stage Electrics" to take away with her (that'll teach 'em).

 

Perhaps the bottom has fallen out of house bashing but were not exactly immune to the economy in this business either - FYI.

 

The thing to note is that the best event sparks that I know would actually make very poor installation electricians and usually vice versa. Other than the fact that we are all working with electricity, the disciplines are quite unconnected and the best person for the job is often someone who has a basic understanding of what everyone else is doing/trying to achieve rather than a head for electrical calculations.

 

Local crewing is a good place to start in that regard.

 

 

being brutally honest, my reasoning for doing this is because I have wanted to for yrs but been tied down, as I am now in different circumstances and all the time in the world to persue what I've wanted to do since 1st seeing iron maiden in 88 when I thought I either want to be on stage or setting it up. seventh son stage was emmence in my eyes! ** laughs out loud **. I go gigs a lot and am always watching the roadies before the gig thinking, wish that was me. ** laughs out loud **. I'm in a good job at a council where our money comes through rent so my job is fairly safe. can never say that though really. sounds like I've done something right getting on local crew. I know people who do it so hopefully I'll prove myself enough to get asked back to do that at least and hopefully build up. just wondered if needed any specific qualies etc. found out a lot. cheers.

 

A concurrent post has been automatically merged from this point on.

 

after looking into the u2 360 stage build and setup on the net, this local crew job looks like a good starting ground even just as a local crew member. I realise I am just moving stuff around for the proffessionals but all part of learning as I see it and asked questions on here before I started so hopefully it might go somewhere 1 day. I'll be grafting but also taking notes of what I can while doing it. cheers everyone. :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
I did the u2 local crew last week, what a stage that is!! I was completely hands on working alongside the real crew. I built bridges, b stage (ego ramp) ** laughs out loud **, fitted speakers under the main stage and wired power amps. I was working with american sound crew called lunchbox and dodsy. I ended up being their right hand man and was left to fit subs and wire feeds to the power amps from the breaker boards while they instructed the rest of the lads. only plugs and leads so a simple job really. ** laughs out loud **. I definitely want to get into this more, if the u2 gig was still in the uk I'd have followed it to the next gig, turned up in my local crew shirt and tried do it again. during the strip out I was on the sound crew and took down 3 banks of the 6 rows of high front of house cabs around the "claw". they were lowered down, fitted dolleys to the bottom cabs while stil in the air, dropped to floor, removed connecting pins, lifted front catches and unplugged/packed the cables / removed any parts of the bracing hardware/chains, then lift the 6 rows of cabs back up, push out 6 disconnected cabs on the dolleys and repeat feeding the main cables into a flight case as they came down. I was on fire at this alongside lunchbox, we pushed the cabs out to the deadheads (some lads really were) to push to the truck haha. found everything is basically click fit or held together with pins. the staging was all click fit legs and locked together with catches. steelwork bridges/truss held together with pins. I worked with a crew member called sox doing this. I showed great interest and they were great as they let me do things and answered my quick questions while we grafted to get it built/stripped out. I found a guy in charge of the elec supplies but he said he could only get me in contact with american firms. fair enough as he was american. ** laughs out loud **. really enjoyed it and been told I will get more local crew work. hard graft but like playing with a masive mechano kit. loved every minute! 17hrs to fit the production gear, 4 hrs to strip it out, load it up and get it out. very organised chaos. loved it! I asked them all how to get on the crew and they all said the same thing. be in the wrong place at the wrong time. ** laughs out loud **. this wasn't the answer I was looking for but was funny that they all said the same. ** laughs out loud **. it was good that the real crew had their own jobs and I got more scope working between them. admitedly I didn't touch any lighting or video. maybe next time. ** laughs out loud **. the job before and after the stage was there was doing the flooring metals and plastics on the pitch. I even enjoyed that but that was the most major backbreaking work. it was beyond just lifting the staging sections into place just at chest hight haha. local crew basically lugged everything round and put everything together and the crew basically levelled everything up and told us what to do. I could definitely get into this given the chance. if any road crew want a decent apprentice who is willing to learn then let me know. I'll quit work tomorrow.. ** laughs out loud **. lunchbox commented that even for an electrician my cable untangling skills were good and fast hahaha. was hrs of fun. ** laughs out loud **. in total 8 days work for a 2hr show from empty stadium to empty stadium. I now know a little bit of what to do physically, it's what do I need to have to do it full time.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good to see you got some work, but a word on the use of the word "Deadheads". First major gig and all that.

 

In my early days on my first major tour we were at a stadium in Sweden, when I decided to slate some of the local crew. One of our drivers overheard me, pulled me to one side and this was his advise:

 

"Be nice to people on the way up, because you will probably meet them on the way down".

 

Taught me a lesson! :P

 

Billy

 

Ps, And you can be the production manager, but when needed, you'll still be loading trucks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not so much touring, but In theatre, It's sometimes quite a realisation when you look through programs, and see one day the Production Electrician was 'bob' and the general LX crew was 'gill' but then I turn to another program and the Production Electrician was 'gill' and the general LX crew was 'bob'

 

When freelancing your never in the same role all the time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good to see you got some work, but a word on the use of the word "Deadheads". First major gig and all that.

 

In my early days on my first major tour we were at a stadium in Sweden, when I decided to slate some of the local crew. One of our drivers overheard me, pulled me to one side and this was his advise:

 

"Be nice to people on the way up, because you will probably meet them on the way down".

 

Taught me a lesson! ;)

 

Billy

 

Ps, And you can be the production manager, but when needed, you'll still be loading trucks.

 

 

by "deadheads" I mean some of the young lads on the local crew who really didn't want to do anything and just stood there looking blank while others were alert and trying to help and taking orders. treated it as just a bit of spare cash it seemed. I understand your saying and what you said there. I heard a saying I was learn't while training yrs ago. "the day you realise you know nothing is the day you will learn something" I'm not pretending I now know anything, I did learn a lot though for my first job in it. :-) the main thing I learnt is that I enjoy the work and banter etc. when it all fires up it's a great sence of achievement, even know you pull it apart hrs later. ** laughs out loud **. (I'm losing that sence a bit in my current work purely because I've done it for 14yrs I think). it was a bit like playing with toys and I did learn how certain things fitted together. like a big mechano kit with lights and sound. ** laughs out loud **. hard graft!!! but hrs of fun!

 

A concurrent post has been automatically merged from this point on.

 

I've served an appreticeship and trained apprentices. I know the score of how to learn and how to act and not too. ** laughs out loud **. I just want the chance to be an appretice again really and learn at something in this area. I also understand not all productions are like the enormity of the u2 claw stage but I loved every min of being part of it all coming together in general. ** laughs out loud **. where my current job is all about making it last this is about getting it in, getting it up and then getting it down and out again asap to inevitably start again. (so to speak. ** laughs out loud **). obviously the more you stuck with 1 tour the quicker it would be the more you did it. I understand that from my very little experience that wiring some cabs etc to lifting the steels of the floor is all an equal part of the same overall aim.. in, up, then out. ** laughs out loud **. empty place before, empty place after, with a lot of various graft inbetween. ** laughs out loud **. I can just keep local crewing but why not aim a bit higher in the end if I can. I don't want to be a tour manager, I just want hands on graft building things. thats my kind of thing. same in sparking, I couldn't sit in no office doing this job or just overlook. ** laughs out loud **. I'm 32 so got a bit of nowse and been single again for nearly a yr. why not try something to do something I enjoy innit? I build models (railway), I'm an electrician, love going gigs as often as I can, play guitar in a band myself and done disco's and built the little lights in the past ** laughs out loud **, I've done this u2 gig and enjoyed it so my interests all sort of point in the direction a bit in a way if you know what I mean. ** laughs out loud **.

 

it's just how?? and doing what??. I need a mentor!!. ** laughs out loud **. I'm looking into supplies as I was advised, but I think they just get hired to run supplies at the venue rather than on the touring crew??. might take yrs of retraining but just want to find out. possibly lighting or sound. not controlling them , just fitting them and wiring them. (flying them as a professional may say?). ** laughs out loud **. the hands on work!. :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.