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is it possible to have a raked stage in the round


mattward11

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A raked stage can be many things. Do you mean just a simple rake, tilting in one dimension? Or something more complex? Anything's possible - whether or not it's desirable is another matter.

 

 

I want to do it in a complete round with the audience looking into it from the upper circle.and the ghost appearing from the middlle of the stage.

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Of course it's possible. It's not as practical if you have to use stock platforming to save money, but you could still do it by building curved pieces to attach to the stock rectangles.

 

The most practical framing technique might be to use (U.S. term...)gate-style framing, where you lay out flat frames that run all the way from downstage to upstage, with legs of increasing length, and the same bevel at the top of each leg, where they meet the horizontal framing rail on which the plywood/OSB rests. Because all this layout is done flat on the floor or template table, it's very easy to get the legs correct "the first time". The drawback is that it requires lots of materials that likely can't be re-used. Most likely each downstage leg would have a bevel ripped (i.e. vertically on the leg) for the facing will cover the rake in a curve that matches the deck's downstage curve.

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I want to do it in a complete round with the audience looking into it from the upper circle.and the ghost appearing from the middlle of the stage.
So what you're saying is that you want a concave rake - sort of a "bowl" kind of affair - which inclines upwards towards the edge of the circle and with the audience looking down into it? As has been said, yes, it's possible. But be aware that making a rake too steep can lead to big problems for the actors. The ABTT has recently published a set of guidelines for raked stages - I thought it was on their website somewhere, but I can't find it ; perhaps someone could post a link to it if they know where it is?
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I want to do it in a complete round with the audience looking into it from the upper circle.and the ghost appearing from the middlle of the stage.
So what you're saying is that you want a concave rake - sort of a "bowl" kind of affair - which inclines upwards towards the edge of the circle and with the audience looking down into it? As has been said, yes, it's possible. But be aware that making a rake too steep can lead to big problems for the actors. The ABTT has recently published a set of guidelines for raked stages - I thought it was on their website somewhere, but I can't find it ; perhaps someone could post a link to it if they know where it is?

 

 

 

thats what I would like to try and do yes in a bowl shape. ive been told by my tutors to challenge myself so I thought id try this method.

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Well, it's certainly a challenge, if only for the chippies! Just remember that you're looking at a constantly-changing three-dimensional curve, not just a simple rake. Your first port of call should be a copy of the recent ABTT rake guidelines (if all else fails, give them a ring and ask them to send you a copy). Once you've read and digested that, you also need to bear in mind that you're going to have to lift the whole audience up by the height of the outside of the 'bowl', and that in itself is going to add a lot of time and expense to the project (Steeldeck, legs, access stairs, guard rails, etc.)
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I designed the set for a production of 'The Crucible'. the main perfomance area was a large, shallow disk.

Worked very well. A steep rake on the dish would be very uncomfortable to act on.

Cheers

Gerry

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I'm currently working on a project on Hamlet and I'm interested in trying, if it's possible, to have a raked, or reverse-raked, stage in the round. I'm wondering if it's possible and if anyone has any ideas on how to make it work.

Neglecting the overall practicalities of the project... I would start with a flat circular centre section and then build up the rest of the circular acting area using flat sectors of decking, arranged like a 360 degree fan around the centre.

 

Building the stage shouldn't be a huge problem but arranging for the Ghost to appear in the centre will be very difficult. Unless you have a convenient trap in the centre of the original space, you will have to build the central circle high enough above the floor to permit access from underneath. The stage will then rise even higher towards the perimeter and I can imagine that you may well have to raise the first row of the Audience seating by at least six feet and would probably need to rake the seating very steeply in order for the subsequent rows of audience to have any view of the stage.

 

Best of luck

 

David

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